Sharpshooter 1.1 – Name your captured clips in real-time (October 29, 2010)

Posted: October 29, 2010 by docbabad in Software Reviews
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

By Harry {doc} Babad, © Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.

Publisher: Isaac Wankerl
, Kerlmax LLC
Website:
http://www.kerlmax.com/products/sharpshooter/
System Requirements
: Mac OS X 10.4 or later, including Mac OS X 10.6 (Snow Leopard)
 Mac computer with either an Intel or PowerPC processor
 8.9 MB Hard Drive space
Release Date
: September 15, 2009        Download Size: 4.2 MB
Shareware Cost
: $15 USD — Free to try for 30 days.
Star Ratings
— 5.0

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Audience: Anyone who takes screenshots

Strengths: Sharpshooter is a helper utility designed to give you more control over your screenshots. It lets you choose what to do with your shots as you take them.

Weaknesses: None, I wish I had this tool when I was writing my nuclear textbooks. I was so overloaded with screen shots and cropped clippings that I almost screamed into my coffee.

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Introduction

As an author and blogger, not they are not the same; I often have the need to capture images. These may originate from screen shots taken within the software I review, or are clipped parts of images googled. [Trimming an image does not require a graphics program such as iPhoto, PSE or GraphicConverter].

Over the years I’ve tried my programs that propose to help me do screen capture, including such stalwarts as:

An early simple version of Voila, [http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/29995/voila] which as version 3.0 is now a full featured tool; to the elegant and full featured Snapz then standard and now Snapz Pro X 2.2.3 [http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/6149/snapz-pro-x].

I also played with a few other freeware/shareware products such as:

All of these products were and still are highly regarded in both Macworld and MacUpdate reviews and indeed I gave SnapNDrag a “5” in the October 2009 issue of macCompanion. However, I’ve most part I’ve stuck with Apple’s finder commands and the use of Apple’s Grab application. Why — That’s all I needed, then and now.

Apples Screen Capture Tools Limitations — But that didn’t/doesn’t stop me from grousing about the limitations of Apples tools. The image below shows the Sharpshooter solution.

One gripe was my desire to capture all my images as JPEGs, something I figured out how to do, but now don’t remember how.

  • The second was my desire to give the images names at the time they were captured getting way from the ‘picture 1 – picture 2… metaphor. After all I knew what I was thinking about when I captured the image, and really wanted to label it appropriately, in real-time. That would save me from dinking around when narrowing down the number of images I used, an editor’s constraint, in my articles.

Eureka, I found Sharpshooter meets my added ‘naming’ needs, as well as allowing flexibly in changing their format, it a real find.

Publishers Description — Sharpshooter is a small application, which aids the management of screenshots. When you take a screenshot on Mac OS X with Command-Shift-3, Command-Shift-4 (or with another variation). Sharpshooter is a background agent application so you. I did, may want to add it as a login item to always have it running in the background. You can control Sharpshooter through the menu status item on the right side of the menu bar.

 

Getting Started

Drop the sharpshooter application into your, you guessed it, application folder. Use it free for 30 days or pay the modest shareware fee and enter your license code. There it was, its icon sitting neatly in my menu bar. The develop claims that begin able to name your images, while the subject is still fresh on your mind, is a great time saving advantage. I agree. You can even, if your addicted to scanner naming conventions or those on your camera, use its default name with or without the extension.

As always, in a hurry, I instantly found a screen shot I wanted to capture. In less than two blinks of an eye, there it was. The software’s’ main window was there ready to use as described in the review. Type in what you want for an image title, change to the format you want – your done. I actually used the product for a few days before I decided to check to see what it’s preference panes offered. If you use two monitors, that’s the place to ‘tune’ things up.

Review Limitations

I found the product to be rock stable.

There’s two attributes (features) I did not test.

  • First, Sharpshooter has the ability to work with screenshots that span multiple monitors, If you have more than one display connected to your Mac. My iMac screen although 24” in size, lives alone on my desk.
  • Second, an attribute identified in an Aug 13, 2007 review of Sharpshooter version 0.4.1, review in Macworld by Dan Frakes was its ability to deal with the output from other screen capture tools. Since I don’t use any, I could not pull this string. Check http://www.macworld.com/article/59453/2007/08/sharpshooter.html/.

    The product also has a folder-watching watching feature that I did not test because all my screen shots go to my desktop!  Then I can sort them out and put them into the folders that best reflects the project in which I to use them. However, this is not a problem since the software has a first class help function so I can get the information should I ever need it.

    A Wish, Unfulfilled

    Real Time Ability to Input Information to Get Info — I would welcome, either from this or any other screen capture tool, the ability to quickly add information to a file’s spotlight comments [-I] because unless I remember to, I usually have to do an extra search to document the source of the images I capture, especially from Google images. Yes I know this is not a function of a screen capture tool, but “if wishes were horses, beggars would ride.”

    An Added Sharpshooter Preference Desired — I would welcome the ability to select a ‘preference’ to make JPEG conversion my default graphics format. Except for an occasional use of TIFF, JPEG is my image format of choice.

    Conclusions and Recommendations

    This as a simple to use, intuitive and great product. By using its main, and ‘only’ window Sharpshooter where you can review the picture and choose what to do with it. You can either rename, move the screenshot to the Trash, or cancel the operation keeping the captured screenshot as is. The Move To Trash option, combined with an in-window preview, is useful for quickly spotting and deleting obvious screenshot mishaps.

    From the perspective of time it already saved me, it is well worth the $15 shareware fee — a 5 ‘Flower” product!

    APPENDICES

    What Mac OS X keystroke combinations are used to take Screen shots?

    Action Shortcut
    Take a picture of the whole screen ⌘-Shift-3
    Take a picture of part of the screen ⌘-Shift-4, then drag to select the area you want in the picture.

    To cancel, press Escape.

    Take a picture of a window, a menu, the menu bar, or the Dock. Press ⌘-Shift-4, then press the Space bar. Move the pointer over the area you want so that it’s highlighted, then click.

    To drag to select the area instead, press the Space bar again. To cancel, press Escape

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    Copyright Notice: Product and company names and logos in this review may be registered trademarks of their respective companies.

    Reviews were carried out on my iMac 2.8 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo with 2 GB 667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM running Mac OS X version 10.6.4 with all security updates kept current.

    Disclaimer: When reviewing software I will often use the developer’s product, functions and features descriptions. Because of this unless I’m quoting directly from another source, I do no cutter up the review with quotation makes. All other comments are strictly my own and based on testing. Why need I rewrite the developer’s narratives, if they are clearly written?

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